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Tag Archives: Raw Food

Why does Weight Loss Matter to You?

high-triglyceridesSeveral years back, I began to notice a disturbing trend in my life and the lives of the people I cared about. In increasing numbers, the people I loved were complaining of low energy, poor digestion, weight gain, diabetes, arthritis, and dozens of other major and minor ailments.

My efforts to help make a difference in their lives and their health led me down a fascinating, fulfilling and challenging path. It’s not a laughing matter that a friend who was obviously heading for a health disaster would argue with me about a proven method of weight loss and overall health. To sit with someone at dinner and watch them eat bread rolls with lots of butter right after a heart attack or stroke is shocking.

I started out trying to work out a healthy diet for myself that showed fast results. I did find it, but others, having not done the research wouldn’t adopt it as their way of life.

Thus this educational series to help one and all transform to a healthy lifestyle full of fun and vigor. I learned about the benefits of a lifestyle that emphasizes raw, enzyme-rich food.

If all this lifestyle did was remove the worry of having a sudden heart attack or stroke then it is well worth investigating. This is your choice. Please comment for or against what I have to say. Contact me via FaceBook if you want to explore this any further.

Triglycerides are an important measure of heart health. Here’s why triglycerides matter — and what to do if your triglycerides are too high.

If you’ve been keeping an eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, there’s something else you might need to monitor: your triglycerides. Having a high level of triglycerides, a type of fat (lipid) in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. However, the same lifestyle choices that promote overall health can help lower your triglycerides, too.

What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn’t need to use right away into triglycerides. The triglycerides are stored in your fat cells. Later, hormones release triglycerides for energy between meals. If you regularly eat more calories than you burn, particularly “easy” calories like carbohydrates and fats, you may have high triglycerides.

What’s considered normal?

A simple blood test can reveal whether your triglycerides fall into a healthy range.

  • Normal — Less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
  • Borderline high — 150 to 199 mg/dL
  • High — 200 to 499 mg/dL
  • Very high — 500 mg/dL

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that a triglyceride level of 100 mg/dL or lower is considered “optimal.” The AHA says this optimal level would improve your heart health. However, the AHA doesn’t recommend drug treatment to reach this level. Instead, for those trying to lower their triglycerides to this level, lifestyle changes such as diet, weight loss and physical activity are encouraged. That’s because triglycerides usually respond well to dietary and lifestyle changes.

Your doctor will usually check for high triglycerides as part of a cholesterol test (sometimes called a lipid panel or lipid profile). You’ll have to fast for nine to 12 hours before blood can be drawn for an accurate triglyceride measurement.

What’s the difference between triglycerides and cholesterol?

Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body with energy, and cholesterol is used to build cells and certain hormones. Because triglycerides and cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, they circulate throughout your body with the help of proteins that transport the lipids (lipoproteins).

Why do high triglycerides matter?

Although it’s unclear how, high triglycerides may contribute to hardening of the arteries or thickening of the artery walls (atherosclerosis) — which increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and heart disease.

High triglycerides are often a sign of other conditions that increase the risk of heart disease and stroke as well, including obesity and metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that includes too much fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high blood sugar and abnormal cholesterol levels.

Sometimes high triglycerides are a sign of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, low levels of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism), liver or kidney disease, or rare genetic conditions that affect how your body converts fat to energy. High triglycerides could also be a side effect of taking medications such as beta blockers, birth control pills, diuretics, steroids or the breast cancer drug tamoxifen.

What’s the best way to lower triglycerides?

Healthy lifestyle choices are key.

  • Lose weight If you’re overweight, losing 5 to 10 pounds can help lower your triglycerides. Motivate yourself by focusing on the benefits of losing weight, such as more energy and improved health.
  • Cut back on calories. Remember that extra calories are converted to triglycerides and stored as fat. Reducing your calories will reduce triglycerides.
  • Avoid sugary and refined foods. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar and foods made with white flour, can increase triglycerides.
  • Limit the cholesterol in your diet. Aim for no more than 300 milligrams (mg) of cholesterol a day — or less than 200 mg if you have heart disease. Avoid the most concentrated sources of cholesterol, including meats high in saturated fat, egg yolks and whole milk products.
  • Choose healthier fats. Trade saturated fat found in meats for healthier monounsaturated fat found in plants, such as olive, peanut and canola oils. Substitute fish high in omega-3 fatty acids — such as mackerel and salmon — for red meat.
  • Eliminate trans fat. Trans fat can be found in some fried foods and commercial baked products, such as cookies, crackers and snack cakes. But don’t rely on packages that label their foods as free of trans fat. In the United States, if a food contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fat a serving, it can be labeled trans fat-free. Even though those amounts seem small, they can add up quickly if you eat a lot of foods containing small amounts of trans fat. Instead, read the ingredients list. You can tell that a food has trans fat in it if it contains partially hydrogenated oil.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink. Alcohol is high in calories and sugar and has a particularly potent effect on triglycerides. Even small amounts of alcohol can raise triglyceride levels.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week. Regular exercise can boost “good” cholesterol while lowering “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides. Take a brisk daily walk, swim laps or join an exercise group. If you don’t have time to exercise for 30 minutes, try squeezing it in 10 minutes at a time. Take a short walk, climb the stairs at work, or try some situps or pushups as you watch television.

It’s also important to control diabetes and high blood pressure if you have high triglycerides and one of these conditions.

Niacin. Niacin, sometimes called nicotinic acid, can lower your triglycerides and your “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol).

 

Paul Turnbull, Purpose Consultant

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Anti-parasitic Raw Foods

Ginger Mint Green SmoothieWhat are parasites? 

Parasites are organisms that derive nourishment and protection from other living organisms known as hosts. They may be transmitted from animals to humans, from humans to humans, or from humans to animals. Several parasites have emerged as significant causes of foodborne and waterborne illness. These organisms live and reproduce within the tissues and organs of infected human and animal hosts, and are often excreted in feces. 

Parasites can live within the intestines for years without causing any symptoms. When they do, symptoms include the following:

  • Fatigue

  • Abdominal pain

  • Diarrhea

  • Nausea or vomiting

  • Gas or bloating

  • Dysentery (loose stools containing blood and mucus)

  • Rash or itching around the rectum or vulva

  • Stomach pain or tenderness

  • Feeling tired

  • Weight loss

  • Passing a worm in your stool

Is there a remedy?

Eat an abundance of raw foods considered “anti-parasitic,” such as cabbage and onions, garlic, pineapple, pumpkin seeds, almonds, figs, blackberries, papaya, pomegranate, ginger, hot peppers, radishes, coconut oil, and cloves. Implement fasting as well, as an overall body cleanse.

It’s also recommended to exclude honey and dried fruit from your diet when treating for parasites.

On a raw diet you have a better chance of keeping a clean, alkaline bloodstream and a healthier intestinal terrain to discourage parasites from sticking around. The name of the game: If you want to get rid of and stay rid of parasites, become a poor host!

  • Apple cider vinegar, a tablespoon per 8 ounces of pure water to help alkaline your body
  • Fresh ginger root- boiled into a tea or included in your food, like in a stir fry
  • Fresh garlic, a natural microbe fighter
  • Oil of oregano, which is anti microbial
  • Turmeric, which is highly anti inflammatory
  • Coconut, coconut, coconut!  Another great use for coconut is soothing an upset stomach as it helps maintain intestinal flora
  • A probiotic supplement, one not sourced from dairy or soy and not containing yeasts
  • Add papaya and pineapple in moderation, to provide bromelain, an enzyme which aids in digestion
  • Focus on copious leafy greens, and possibly a bit less fruit, temporarily, as many bacteria tend to feed on sugar.

In addition, if your stomach is feeling particularly sore, you may want to focus on steaming your veggies for a few days simply to make them easier to digest. 

I have a powerful raw food blender that I put a combination of kale, ginger, raw cocoa powder, pineapple, spirulina, chlorella, apple,pure water and some stevia to sweeten the taste. Most times it turns out tasting like ginger ale and of course it’s all raw and I have the fiber of the whole foods.

 

 

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Heal Thy Self or Healthy Self

I came across this description of why the body stores fat while searching a new greens product that I’m trying. It makes total sense. 

“Life’s daily functions, such as digestion, stress, exercise, and the consumption of processed foods, coffee or alcohol all form acid. When your body’s pH is in the acidic range, it retains water to dilute the acidity and stores fat to protect the body’s organs from the acidity.” ref: Amazing Grass Raw Reserve.

I’ve been eating a lot more raw whole foods lately with a resultant loss of fat. I’m using a high powered bender that allows me to quickly extract all the nutrients out of the food. I’m using Stevia as a sweetener and couldn’t be happier. My wife even caught me singing in the shower, my workouts are more intense and I have much more energy. Plus there is the not so obvious benefit of not getting a disease somewhere down the line.

 

 

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To be Obese or not to be, that is the question

Picture this scenario: It’s January 2013 and you’re recalling that last year you vowed to lose 30 lbs in the coming year. You start out with a fad diet and lose the 30 lbs in 30 days eating only 500 calories a day. Now you feel it’s OK to cheat a little and start to drink specialty coffees and the sugar in them sets your body to craving more sweets. You give in and you go on a gradual binge and gain back the 30 lbs plus 10. You’re worse off now than a year earlier. Plus you start beating up on yourself for being such a weakling and a quitter. Fortunately it’s 2012 and you still have a chance to change your way of eating so that by 2013 you’ve lost 30 lbs for real and can keep it off.

Your purpose is to find the right combination of foods that stop the cravings, make you feel full and allow you to lose weight at a gradual pace over the year.

Your goal is to go to the grocery store and stock up on nutritious foods that can promote health, protect you against disease and cause weight reduction.  Although you have the best of intentions, as soon as you slip into the cookie aisle, temptations run wild and unhealthy thoughts cascade into your mind producing a dreamy state of ecstasy. Fortunately for you, you had told your wife of your intentions and she grabs you and shakes you back to the present before you can consume any of the delights that would ruin all your well set plans.

Here’s why you can’t let those temptations destroy your future good health:

“In the quest for the American Dream, we have fallen into a nutritional nightmare. With our fast paced lives, who has time anymore to prepare food?  The American kitchen is now a microwave. Our kid’s dinning table is now the back seat of our cars and home cooking has been replaced with convenience meals. Farm fresh has been replaced with flash frozen and 10,000 preservatives. The #1 eaten vegetable in America is now French fries. Friends we don’t eat foods anymore. We eat merchandise. The degrading of the American eating habit is a major contributor to poor health and the resulting consequences. Add unheard of levels of stress and anxiety, a lack of exercise and sleep and now you have a recipe for disaster, the American health disaster.” Dr. Richard Schulze.

In some of my previous articles on diet and health I’ve told you what I’ve done to lose weight and keep it off. I’m still following this way of eating and I only fluctuate a pound or two above or below my ideal weight. I continue to exercise daily in case I miss a day. I even went into a lot of preparation of the food I was eating and enjoyed it more and more. However for those who are just starting out a full change is not likely to happen. So here is my latest recommendation. Buy a bottle of Dr. Schulze’s SuperFood Plus and start out gradually with on tablespoon in the morning per his instructions just before you start your workout, then work up to a two tablespoon dose. Now you’ve got all your needed vitamins, minerals and the best concentrated protein for the day. Of course, drink lots of water. You’ll get the energy you need out of doing this.

Then simply start dropping those bad processed foods out of your diet and adding nutritious foods. If you cheat, don’t cheat two days in a row or only do it once a week.

Here’s some guidelines:

1. Colorful fruits and vegetables:  Red, green, orange, yellow and purple—more color means more variety of healthful nutrients and disease fighting compounds, such as antioxidants.  Studies show that consuming 5-10 servings of fruits and vegetables a day can help prevent and fight many diseases such as obesity, cancer and heart disease.  Try berries, apples, oranges, leafy greens, carrots, squash, sweet potato and peppers.

2. Complex carbohydrates: 100% whole grain, whole wheat, oat bran, rye, spelt and kamut (organic kamut is absolutely delicious and very nutritious for you. A member of the wheat family, kamut is considered the “high energy grain” because it contains 40% more protein than the national average for wheat) are complex carbohydrates that provide your body with the energy, B vitamins and fiber it needs.  Look for breads, cereals, pastas and crackers that say “good source of fiber” or “high fiber”.  Avoid simple carbohydrates such as white breads, crackers and other products made from white flour, which are stripped of their nutrients and fiber and are not a good source of nutrition.

3. Legumes:  Beans, peas and lentils are highly nutritious foods that are a good source of cholesterol-lowering soluble fiber. Legumes rank low on the Glycemic Index scale helping regulate blood sugar levels by producing less insulin.  Legumes also provide useful protein, iron and B vitamins for those eating vegetarian diets. Try adding kidney beans, chickpeas or soybeans to salads, wraps, soups and pasta. If you experience gas from eating beans, soak the beans overnight and drink plenty of water.

Paul Turnbull

 
 

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Raw Whole Food!

Fred at Army ExerciseI was reminded again last week why I eat a diet that contains mostly raw food. I was given a book by Traci Sellers called “Traci’s Traditional Health Principles. I read it from cover to cover and it confirmed that a person who eats a raw food diet can in most cases avoid the common diseases that are befalling the American public at an alarming rate.

Obesity in children and adults is skyrocketing! And I don’t know about you but several people I am close to have had major health conditions requiring surgery or in one case sudden death. Obviously they are responsible for the health of their own bodies but I obviously failed to truly inform them that the cause of their disease is in all likelihood coming from the food they eat.

I would enjoy receiving your comments on this subject and would like to hear your successes at weight loss or how you’ve maintained your health through diet, water and exercise.

My secret for the last three years is to eat a mostly raw food diet and stray from it only occasionally. My other secret is that I get my raw food from the WholeFood Farmacy( www.familylife.wholefoodfarmacy.com ), conveniently packaged and ready to eat.

Last year my friend Phil and I rode our motorcycles from Florida to Canada living on raw food and water that we carried in our saddlebags. We enjoyed the trip immensely and only went wrong out of boredom when we ate in restaurants once on the way up and once on the way back. Both times, even though we tried to eat healthy from the menu, we didn’t feel quite right afterwards and regretted eating commercially produced food.

I’ve maintained my weight for the last 3 years and I’ve had enough energy to keep me creative and active. My wife and I watched an old movie about “WoodStock” which happened in 1968 where a half million people attended this festival. What struck me while watching it was the fact that out of that many people, a cross section of American public, there wasn’t one fat or heavy person, in fact they were all skinny in comparison to today’s standards. And I’ve seen photos of classrooms from the 1800’s and every child and adult in the photos was skinny. That should tell you something about how our diet has changed in the last forty years.

Yours in Health,

Paul Turnbull (727) 445-7842

President, EP Management, Inc.

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2009 in Raw Food

 

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