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Tag Archives: Heart Attack

Binge Eating Signs and Symptoms

Fatties 2I’m going to take a different approach to health over the holiday season. I can’t seem to encourage certain people to start transforming to a healthy lifestyle in the face of intended binge-eating. I’ve even been told not to talk about the subject of health until after New Years. I really don’t understand this as bing-eating is a serious compulsion in which you frequently consume unusually large amounts of food. Almost everyone overeats on occasion, such as having seconds or thirds of a holiday meal. But for some people, overeating crosses the line to binge-eating and it becomes a regular occurrence, usually done in secret.

I remember as a kid, my aunt hosting the New Years day family get together. Aunt Lizzy was a fantastic cook and really went all out to serve those foods everyone loved. Unfortunately, after the meal, most of the men passed out in the living room watching football leaving the women to clean up. In those days the women served the meal while the family ate and then they ate afterwards. This is what saved them from being as obese as the men.

Please understand that this was the custom and the number of passed out people was the sign of a well cooked meal topped off with cigars and whiskey.

heartattackgrillmenuWhen you’re a binge-eater, you swear you won’t do it again. But again comes quickly as you are required to take leftovers home. You may be deeply embarrassed about gorging and vow to stop. But you feel such a compulsion that you can’t resist the urges and continue binge-eating. There is no treatment for bing-eating without first having a strong intention to stop. Usually a heart attack or diabetes prompts a change in eating habits and you go unwillingly to the hospital or doctor. But here is a fact you have to totally understand; in 60% of heart conditions the first symptom is sudden death. You don’t get another chance.

There’s one symptom that can foretell your future; weight or fat gain.

You may have no obvious physical signs or symptoms when you’re a binge-eater. You may be overweight or obese, or you may be at a normal weight. However, you likely have numerous behavioral and emotional signs and symptoms, such as:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food

  • Eating even when you’re full or not hungry

  • Eating rapidly during binge episodes

  • Eating until you’re uncomfortably full

  • Frequently eating alone

  • Feeling that your eating behavior is out of control

  • Feeling depressed, disgusted, ashamed, guilty or upset about your eating

  • Experiencing depression and anxiety

  • Feeling isolated and having difficulty talking about your feelings

  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

  • Losing and gaining weight repeatedly, also called yo-yo dieting

After a binge, you may try to diet or eat normal meals. But restricting your eating may simply lead to more binge eating, creating a vicious cycle.

The first thing to decide is to get off this unmerry-go-round and transition to a healthy lifestyle that allows you to eat all the right foods you want and also gives you a variety.

I do know of a program that does exactly that but it would be a waste of time if you haven’t decided that you’ve had it on your present lifestyle and turn yourself in. I’ll help you with the rest.

Warning: If you’re having a heart attack or other threatening symptoms, please call 911.

Paul Turnbull 727-643-8376

Purpose Consultant

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Why does Weight Loss Matter to You?

high-triglyceridesSeveral years back, I began to notice a disturbing trend in my life and the lives of the people I cared about. In increasing numbers, the people I loved were complaining of low energy, poor digestion, weight gain, diabetes, arthritis, and dozens of other major and minor ailments.

My efforts to help make a difference in their lives and their health led me down a fascinating, fulfilling and challenging path. It’s not a laughing matter that a friend who was obviously heading for a health disaster would argue with me about a proven method of weight loss and overall health. To sit with someone at dinner and watch them eat bread rolls with lots of butter right after a heart attack or stroke is shocking.

I started out trying to work out a healthy diet for myself that showed fast results. I did find it, but others, having not done the research wouldn’t adopt it as their way of life.

Thus this educational series to help one and all transform to a healthy lifestyle full of fun and vigor. I learned about the benefits of a lifestyle that emphasizes raw, enzyme-rich food.

If all this lifestyle did was remove the worry of having a sudden heart attack or stroke then it is well worth investigating. This is your choice. Please comment for or against what I have to say. Contact me via FaceBook if you want to explore this any further.

Triglycerides are an important measure of heart health. Here’s why triglycerides matter — and what to do if your triglycerides are too high.

If you’ve been keeping an eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, there’s something else you might need to monitor: your triglycerides. Having a high level of triglycerides, a type of fat (lipid) in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. However, the same lifestyle choices that promote overall health can help lower your triglycerides, too.

What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn’t need to use right away into triglycerides. The triglycerides are stored in your fat cells. Later, hormones release triglycerides for energy between meals. If you regularly eat more calories than you burn, particularly “easy” calories like carbohydrates and fats, you may have high triglycerides.

What’s considered normal?

A simple blood test can reveal whether your triglycerides fall into a healthy range.

  • Normal — Less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
  • Borderline high — 150 to 199 mg/dL
  • High — 200 to 499 mg/dL
  • Very high — 500 mg/dL

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that a triglyceride level of 100 mg/dL or lower is considered “optimal.” The AHA says this optimal level would improve your heart health. However, the AHA doesn’t recommend drug treatment to reach this level. Instead, for those trying to lower their triglycerides to this level, lifestyle changes such as diet, weight loss and physical activity are encouraged. That’s because triglycerides usually respond well to dietary and lifestyle changes.

Your doctor will usually check for high triglycerides as part of a cholesterol test (sometimes called a lipid panel or lipid profile). You’ll have to fast for nine to 12 hours before blood can be drawn for an accurate triglyceride measurement.

What’s the difference between triglycerides and cholesterol?

Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body with energy, and cholesterol is used to build cells and certain hormones. Because triglycerides and cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, they circulate throughout your body with the help of proteins that transport the lipids (lipoproteins).

Why do high triglycerides matter?

Although it’s unclear how, high triglycerides may contribute to hardening of the arteries or thickening of the artery walls (atherosclerosis) — which increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and heart disease.

High triglycerides are often a sign of other conditions that increase the risk of heart disease and stroke as well, including obesity and metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that includes too much fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high blood sugar and abnormal cholesterol levels.

Sometimes high triglycerides are a sign of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, low levels of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism), liver or kidney disease, or rare genetic conditions that affect how your body converts fat to energy. High triglycerides could also be a side effect of taking medications such as beta blockers, birth control pills, diuretics, steroids or the breast cancer drug tamoxifen.

What’s the best way to lower triglycerides?

Healthy lifestyle choices are key.

  • Lose weight If you’re overweight, losing 5 to 10 pounds can help lower your triglycerides. Motivate yourself by focusing on the benefits of losing weight, such as more energy and improved health.
  • Cut back on calories. Remember that extra calories are converted to triglycerides and stored as fat. Reducing your calories will reduce triglycerides.
  • Avoid sugary and refined foods. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar and foods made with white flour, can increase triglycerides.
  • Limit the cholesterol in your diet. Aim for no more than 300 milligrams (mg) of cholesterol a day — or less than 200 mg if you have heart disease. Avoid the most concentrated sources of cholesterol, including meats high in saturated fat, egg yolks and whole milk products.
  • Choose healthier fats. Trade saturated fat found in meats for healthier monounsaturated fat found in plants, such as olive, peanut and canola oils. Substitute fish high in omega-3 fatty acids — such as mackerel and salmon — for red meat.
  • Eliminate trans fat. Trans fat can be found in some fried foods and commercial baked products, such as cookies, crackers and snack cakes. But don’t rely on packages that label their foods as free of trans fat. In the United States, if a food contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fat a serving, it can be labeled trans fat-free. Even though those amounts seem small, they can add up quickly if you eat a lot of foods containing small amounts of trans fat. Instead, read the ingredients list. You can tell that a food has trans fat in it if it contains partially hydrogenated oil.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink. Alcohol is high in calories and sugar and has a particularly potent effect on triglycerides. Even small amounts of alcohol can raise triglyceride levels.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week. Regular exercise can boost “good” cholesterol while lowering “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides. Take a brisk daily walk, swim laps or join an exercise group. If you don’t have time to exercise for 30 minutes, try squeezing it in 10 minutes at a time. Take a short walk, climb the stairs at work, or try some situps or pushups as you watch television.

It’s also important to control diabetes and high blood pressure if you have high triglycerides and one of these conditions.

Niacin. Niacin, sometimes called nicotinic acid, can lower your triglycerides and your “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol).

 

Paul Turnbull, Purpose Consultant

 

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