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Tag Archives: Diabetes

Binge Eating Signs and Symptoms

Fatties 2I’m going to take a different approach to health over the holiday season. I can’t seem to encourage certain people to start transforming to a healthy lifestyle in the face of intended binge-eating. I’ve even been told not to talk about the subject of health until after New Years. I really don’t understand this as bing-eating is a serious compulsion in which you frequently consume unusually large amounts of food. Almost everyone overeats on occasion, such as having seconds or thirds of a holiday meal. But for some people, overeating crosses the line to binge-eating and it becomes a regular occurrence, usually done in secret.

I remember as a kid, my aunt hosting the New Years day family get together. Aunt Lizzy was a fantastic cook and really went all out to serve those foods everyone loved. Unfortunately, after the meal, most of the men passed out in the living room watching football leaving the women to clean up. In those days the women served the meal while the family ate and then they ate afterwards. This is what saved them from being as obese as the men.

Please understand that this was the custom and the number of passed out people was the sign of a well cooked meal topped off with cigars and whiskey.

heartattackgrillmenuWhen you’re a binge-eater, you swear you won’t do it again. But again comes quickly as you are required to take leftovers home. You may be deeply embarrassed about gorging and vow to stop. But you feel such a compulsion that you can’t resist the urges and continue binge-eating. There is no treatment for bing-eating without first having a strong intention to stop. Usually a heart attack or diabetes prompts a change in eating habits and you go unwillingly to the hospital or doctor. But here is a fact you have to totally understand; in 60% of heart conditions the first symptom is sudden death. You don’t get another chance.

There’s one symptom that can foretell your future; weight or fat gain.

You may have no obvious physical signs or symptoms when you’re a binge-eater. You may be overweight or obese, or you may be at a normal weight. However, you likely have numerous behavioral and emotional signs and symptoms, such as:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food

  • Eating even when you’re full or not hungry

  • Eating rapidly during binge episodes

  • Eating until you’re uncomfortably full

  • Frequently eating alone

  • Feeling that your eating behavior is out of control

  • Feeling depressed, disgusted, ashamed, guilty or upset about your eating

  • Experiencing depression and anxiety

  • Feeling isolated and having difficulty talking about your feelings

  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

  • Losing and gaining weight repeatedly, also called yo-yo dieting

After a binge, you may try to diet or eat normal meals. But restricting your eating may simply lead to more binge eating, creating a vicious cycle.

The first thing to decide is to get off this unmerry-go-round and transition to a healthy lifestyle that allows you to eat all the right foods you want and also gives you a variety.

I do know of a program that does exactly that but it would be a waste of time if you haven’t decided that you’ve had it on your present lifestyle and turn yourself in. I’ll help you with the rest.

Warning: If you’re having a heart attack or other threatening symptoms, please call 911.

Paul Turnbull 727-643-8376

Purpose Consultant

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Why does Weight Loss Matter to You?

high-triglyceridesSeveral years back, I began to notice a disturbing trend in my life and the lives of the people I cared about. In increasing numbers, the people I loved were complaining of low energy, poor digestion, weight gain, diabetes, arthritis, and dozens of other major and minor ailments.

My efforts to help make a difference in their lives and their health led me down a fascinating, fulfilling and challenging path. It’s not a laughing matter that a friend who was obviously heading for a health disaster would argue with me about a proven method of weight loss and overall health. To sit with someone at dinner and watch them eat bread rolls with lots of butter right after a heart attack or stroke is shocking.

I started out trying to work out a healthy diet for myself that showed fast results. I did find it, but others, having not done the research wouldn’t adopt it as their way of life.

Thus this educational series to help one and all transform to a healthy lifestyle full of fun and vigor. I learned about the benefits of a lifestyle that emphasizes raw, enzyme-rich food.

If all this lifestyle did was remove the worry of having a sudden heart attack or stroke then it is well worth investigating. This is your choice. Please comment for or against what I have to say. Contact me via FaceBook if you want to explore this any further.

Triglycerides are an important measure of heart health. Here’s why triglycerides matter — and what to do if your triglycerides are too high.

If you’ve been keeping an eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, there’s something else you might need to monitor: your triglycerides. Having a high level of triglycerides, a type of fat (lipid) in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. However, the same lifestyle choices that promote overall health can help lower your triglycerides, too.

What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn’t need to use right away into triglycerides. The triglycerides are stored in your fat cells. Later, hormones release triglycerides for energy between meals. If you regularly eat more calories than you burn, particularly “easy” calories like carbohydrates and fats, you may have high triglycerides.

What’s considered normal?

A simple blood test can reveal whether your triglycerides fall into a healthy range.

  • Normal — Less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
  • Borderline high — 150 to 199 mg/dL
  • High — 200 to 499 mg/dL
  • Very high — 500 mg/dL

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that a triglyceride level of 100 mg/dL or lower is considered “optimal.” The AHA says this optimal level would improve your heart health. However, the AHA doesn’t recommend drug treatment to reach this level. Instead, for those trying to lower their triglycerides to this level, lifestyle changes such as diet, weight loss and physical activity are encouraged. That’s because triglycerides usually respond well to dietary and lifestyle changes.

Your doctor will usually check for high triglycerides as part of a cholesterol test (sometimes called a lipid panel or lipid profile). You’ll have to fast for nine to 12 hours before blood can be drawn for an accurate triglyceride measurement.

What’s the difference between triglycerides and cholesterol?

Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body with energy, and cholesterol is used to build cells and certain hormones. Because triglycerides and cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, they circulate throughout your body with the help of proteins that transport the lipids (lipoproteins).

Why do high triglycerides matter?

Although it’s unclear how, high triglycerides may contribute to hardening of the arteries or thickening of the artery walls (atherosclerosis) — which increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and heart disease.

High triglycerides are often a sign of other conditions that increase the risk of heart disease and stroke as well, including obesity and metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that includes too much fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high blood sugar and abnormal cholesterol levels.

Sometimes high triglycerides are a sign of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, low levels of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism), liver or kidney disease, or rare genetic conditions that affect how your body converts fat to energy. High triglycerides could also be a side effect of taking medications such as beta blockers, birth control pills, diuretics, steroids or the breast cancer drug tamoxifen.

What’s the best way to lower triglycerides?

Healthy lifestyle choices are key.

  • Lose weight If you’re overweight, losing 5 to 10 pounds can help lower your triglycerides. Motivate yourself by focusing on the benefits of losing weight, such as more energy and improved health.
  • Cut back on calories. Remember that extra calories are converted to triglycerides and stored as fat. Reducing your calories will reduce triglycerides.
  • Avoid sugary and refined foods. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar and foods made with white flour, can increase triglycerides.
  • Limit the cholesterol in your diet. Aim for no more than 300 milligrams (mg) of cholesterol a day — or less than 200 mg if you have heart disease. Avoid the most concentrated sources of cholesterol, including meats high in saturated fat, egg yolks and whole milk products.
  • Choose healthier fats. Trade saturated fat found in meats for healthier monounsaturated fat found in plants, such as olive, peanut and canola oils. Substitute fish high in omega-3 fatty acids — such as mackerel and salmon — for red meat.
  • Eliminate trans fat. Trans fat can be found in some fried foods and commercial baked products, such as cookies, crackers and snack cakes. But don’t rely on packages that label their foods as free of trans fat. In the United States, if a food contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fat a serving, it can be labeled trans fat-free. Even though those amounts seem small, they can add up quickly if you eat a lot of foods containing small amounts of trans fat. Instead, read the ingredients list. You can tell that a food has trans fat in it if it contains partially hydrogenated oil.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink. Alcohol is high in calories and sugar and has a particularly potent effect on triglycerides. Even small amounts of alcohol can raise triglyceride levels.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week. Regular exercise can boost “good” cholesterol while lowering “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides. Take a brisk daily walk, swim laps or join an exercise group. If you don’t have time to exercise for 30 minutes, try squeezing it in 10 minutes at a time. Take a short walk, climb the stairs at work, or try some situps or pushups as you watch television.

It’s also important to control diabetes and high blood pressure if you have high triglycerides and one of these conditions.

Niacin. Niacin, sometimes called nicotinic acid, can lower your triglycerides and your “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol).

 

Paul Turnbull, Purpose Consultant

 

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How to Become a Diabetic

An editor in a local newspaper stated that fat people are happier than other people. How does he know? Did he ever have to leave the top buttons of his shirt unfastened on account of his extra chins? Has the pressure from within against the waistband where the cell phone is located ever been so great in his case that he had to partially undress himself to make a call? Does he have to take the tailor’s word for it that his trousers need pressing? He does not. And that sort of a remark is only what might be expected from any person upward of seven feet tall and weighing about ninety-eight pounds with his heavy underwear on. I shall freely take his statements on the joys and ills of the thin. But when he undertakes to tell me that fat people are happier than thin people, it is only hearsay evidence with him and I decline to accept his statements unchallenged. He is going outside of his experience. He is, as you might say, no more than an innocent bystander. Whereas, I am a qualified authority.

I will admit that at one stage of my life, I regarded fleshiness as a desirable asset. The incident came about in this way. There was a circus showing in our town and a number of us proposed to attend it. It was one of those one-ring, one dollar circuses that used to go about over the country, and it is my present recollection that all of us had funds laid by sufficient to buy tickets; but if we could procure admission in the regular way we felt it would be a sinful waste of money to pay our way in.

With this idea in mind we went scouting round back of the main tent to a comparatively secluded spot, and there we found a place where the canvas side-wall lifted clear of the earth for a matter of four or five inches. We held an informal caucus to decide who should go first. The honor lay between two of us–between the present writer, who was reasonably skinny, and another boy, named Thompson, who was even skinnier. He won, as the saying is, on form. It was decided by practically a unanimous vote, he alone dissenting, that he should crawl under and see how the land lay inside. If everything was all right he would make it known by certain signals and we would then follow, one by one.

Two of us lifted the canvas very gently and this Thompson boy started to wriggle under. He was about halfway in when–zip!–like a flash he bodily vanished. He was gone, leaving only the marks where his toes had gouged the soil. Startled, we looked at one another. There was something peculiar about this. Here was a boy who had started into a circus tent in a highly cautious manner, and then finished the trip with undue and sudden reckless haste. It was more than peculiar–it bordered upon the uncanny. It was sinister. Without a word having been spoken we decided to go away from there.

Wearing expressions of intense unconcern and sterling innocence upon our young faces we did go away from there and drifted back in the general direction of the main entrance. We arrived just in time to meet our young friend coming out. He came hurriedly, using his hands and his feet both, his feet for traveling and his hands for rubbing purposes. Immediately behind him was a large, coarse man using language that stamped him as a man who had outgrown the spirit of youth and was preeminently out of touch with the ideals and aims of boyhood.

At that period it seemed to me and to the Thompson boy, who was moved to speak feelingly on the subject, and in fact to all of us, that excessive slimness might have its drawbacks. Since that time several of us have had occasion to change our minds. With the passage of years we have fleshed out, and now we know better. The last time I saw the Thompson boy he was known as Excess-Baggage Thompson. His figure in profile suggested a man carrying a roll-top desk in his arms and his face looked like a face that had refused to jell and was about to run down on his clothes. He spoke longingly of the days of his youth and wondered if the shape of his knees had changed much since the last time he saw them.

This thing of acquiring a tummy steals on one insidiously, like a thief in the night. You notice that you are plumping out a trifle and for the time being you feel a sort of small personal satisfaction in it. Your shirts fit you better. You love the slight strain upon the buttonholes. You admire the pleasant plunking sound suggestive of ripe watermelons when you pat yourself. Then a day comes when the autumn arrives and evening is at hand you take the dress-suit, which fit you so well, out of the closet where it has been hanging and undertake to back yourself into it. You are pained to learn that it is about three sizes too small. At first you are inclined to blame the suit for shrinking, but second thought convinces you that the fault lies elsewhere. It is you that have swollen, not the suit that has shrunk. The buttons that should adorn the front of the coat are now plainly visible from the rear.

You buy another dress-suit and next fall you have out-grown that one too. You pant like a lizard when you run to catch a car. You cross your legs and have to hold the crossed one on with both hands to keep your stomach from shoving it off in space. After a while you quit crossing them and are content with dawdling yourself on your own lap. You are fat! Dog-gone it–you are fat!

Of course you might diet in the same way that a woman diets. You know how a woman diets. She begins the day very resolutely, and if you are her husband you want to avoid irritating her or upsetting her, because hell hath no fury like a woman dieting. For breakfast she takes a swallow of coffee and half of a soda cracker. For luncheon she takes the other half of the cracker and leaves off the coffee. For dinner she orders everything on the menu except the date and the name of the proprietor. She does this in order to give her strength to go on with the treatment.

In summary here’s a fat man’s analysis of a fat man’s diet. What you eat is what you’ll wear. If you eat too many greasy foods, you’ll sweat grease. If you eat a lot of potatoes, you’ll look like Mr. Potato Head. Attending fast food restaurants means you will have fast fat accumulation. Drinking soda pop will kill you faster than cigarettes and if you have a soda and a cig five times a day to keep your energy up, you will die a slow death by consumption.

Diabetes for some is only a meal away. Foods do have a cumulative effect and then one day you can’t believe your eyes, you’ve gained 30 lbs. in three months, you’re short of breath and the breath you have is foul.

There is only one way to reverse this ever growing fat problem and that is to go on a totally raw diet for as long as it takes to reduce to a safe healthy weight. There’s a great video out on this entire subject at

http://www.rawfor30days.com.

Paul Turnbull

 

 

 
 

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