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Category Archives: Elbert Hubbard

Building the Palmer Enterprises

The spectacular growth of chiropractic profession during B.J. Palmer’s ascendancy (1913-1924) is inseparable from the concurrent expansion of the Palmer School of Chiropractic (PSC) and B.J.’s many related businesses. In that era and for decades to come, Palmer, the “Developer,” accurately proclaimed that his “Fountain Head,” the PSC, had graduated 75% of all the chiropractors in the world. In the years immediately following World War I, when federal educational support for veterans became available and the PSC enrollment approached 3,000 students, B.J. truthfully claimed that his was the largest vocational institutional in the nation, probably in the world. Given its preeminence among chiropractic schools and B.J.’s predilection for extraordinary claims, Palmer and his Fountain Head became a major target for medical critics (Brennan, 1983).

Palmer delighted in responding to the criticisms from political medicine. He taunted them, and turned the would-be negative publicity they heaped upon him to his advantage. He had built his “science” with printer’s ink, he declared, and would buy it by the train load. The “P.T. Barnum of Science” knew few limits in his capacity to spread the gospel of chiropractic and the legend of the PSC. When the Illinois Medical Journal branded him “the most dangerous man in Iowa OUT of a prison cell” and as an “insane…paranoiac, a man whose irresponsibility is criminal,” B.J. reveled in his supposed ignominy and responded with posters depicting himself in front of prison gates (Gromala, 1984).

In this period also, B.J. completed perhaps the most scholarly work of his career, An Invisible Government, which offered a scathing indictment of organized medicine and its efforts to monopolize health care. “Maliciousness based on prejudice,” he suggested, was at the heart of the medical trust (Palmer, 1917a, p. 16).

B.J. learned the craft of advertising from mentors such as his father and Elbert Hubbard. The latter was a writer, publisher, lecturer, craftsman and highly successful businessman from upstate New York. Hubbard was also the son of a well-regarded physician who had vigorously promoted the “germ theory” in the latter part of the nineteenth century (Lerner, 1954, pp. 667-76). Elbert Hubbard had dropped out of Harvard University and become a popular “free thinker.” His literary talents brought him to national prominence, and he promoted an anti-intellectual intellectualism that caught B.J.’s fancy. “All colleges are worthless societies; they develop indolence, conceit and theoretical nonsense,” declared the iconoclastic Hubbard (Lerner, 1954, p. 668). His several years as a writer for Arena Magazine of Boston brought him in contact with the drugless healing movement and with turn-of-the-century opposition to the spread of medical practice laws.

Hubbard established his Roycroft printing plant and furniture factory in East Aurora, New York and marketed his products nationwide. He adopted attention-grabbing attire, catchy epigrams and the “Simplified Spelling” method then promoted by Harvard University. His eccentricity caught the public’s eye, and his publishing empire flourished, despite or perhaps because of the criticism it attracted from the establishment. His lecture tours brought him to Davenport, Iowa in 1906, where he spoke at the Burton Opera House. We may speculate about whether B.J. was in attendance on that occasion. In any case, in 1908 Hubbard sought out B.J. and the PSC, which were just beginning to gain a national reputation. Hubbard was impressed with the young doctor, and the two became fast friends. B.J. adopted Hubbard’s style of dress (loose-fitting blouses and large, flowing ties), long hair, publishing style, use of “reformed spelling” and mode of business practice (Gromala, 1984). The two iconoclasts frequently visited one another at their respective headquarters, and B.J. named one of the rooms in his mansion after the East Aurora guru (Palmer, c1977, p. 97).

Hubbard’s death, when a German submarine torpedoed the luxury liner Lusitania in 1915, was a deeply felt loss for Palmer. But the Developer soon surpassed his teachers. The growth of the Palmer Printery, an extension of the PSC, was phenomenal. B.J. quickly cornered a large share of the market for chiropractic advertising materials. In 1916 or 1917 he purchased the patient newsletter established by his prot g and former spinographer, James F. McGinnis, DC, B.J. turned the advertiser into a very successful promotional vehicle, The Chiropractic Educator, a four-page monthly patient newsletter. The Educator was filled with testimonials for the young healing art, and surely angered medical orthodoxy. It was an example of B.J.’s unabashed and unreserved commitment to marketing technology and to teaching his fellow chiropractors to learn and use his methods:

ADVERTISE

“WHEN things ain’t going right with you, and you can’t make them gee; – when business matters look real blue, and you fear bankruptcy; – when cobwebs gather on your stock and customers are rare; – when all your assets are in hock, don’t cuss and tear your hair; – just listen to our good advice and take it if you’re wise; – take a course at The P.S.C. and then go advertise, – and advertise from morn to night; don’t overlook a day, – and soon you’ll see the world go bright, and things will come your way; – invest in good publicity, and fortune you will greet, – and in a little while you’ll be ‘way up on Easy street (Palmer, 1916c).”

In the opinion of the American Medical Association (AMA), advertising was a serious professional sin. The ethical standards of the AMA forbade its members to advertise, other than to list their names, addresses and phone numbers. But B.J. had no such scruples, and decried political medicine’s efforts to prevent non-AMA members (most especially chiropractors) from promoting their practices. Over and over again he reminded his readers that “It pays to advertise!” Health care, he suggested, was a commodity, and should be marketed and sold just like any other consumer item or service. Advertising was as American as apple pie, and AMA et al. had no right to interfere.

Among the most important of his many publishing ventures was the so-called “Palmer Weekly,” B.J.’s personal newsletter, the Fountain Head News (FHN). Established circa 1912, the FHN was significant not for its financial rewards to the Developer (FHN was initially distributed free), but because it connected him to the field, and they to him. The PSC’s monthly journal, The Chiropractor, increasingly functioned as the official periodical of the Universal Chiropractors’ Association (UCA), and featured an ever greater number of articles written by the protective society’s membership. B.J. felt the need for his own, more intimate professional forum.

The FHN offered a smorgasbord of content. Here were published Palmer’s numerous editorials on every topic under the sun (whether of chiropractic relevance or not), news and photos of the burgeoning PSC campus and facilities, reviews of legal defenses and licensing campaigns, notices of state and national professional events, advertisements for various products from the expanding Palmer enterprises, clinical vignettes, prose and poetry, cartoons, and an endless stream of letters to B.J. The Developer used the FHN to tell the tales of his various travels around the country, and reprinted newspaper accounts of his lecture tours. When he ventured by train in 1916 to San Francisco to embark on his first sea-going voyage (to Hawaii), groups of chiropractors, advised of his itinerary by the FHN, greeted B.J. and Mabel at each train stop along the way (Palmer, 1916b). Many columns were devoted to condemnation of vivisection and compulsory vaccination; sometimes whole issues reviewed medical handling of various epidemics. B.J. brought considerable humor to these topics; a piece of prose authored by Martha Hart (Hart, 1918) was typical:

The correspondence reprinted in the pages of the FHN is of special historical importance. It mattered not whether the writer expressed pro- or anti-Palmer sentiments: B.J. published it all the same. (Of course, he always got the last word in his own newsletter.) Owing to his eagerness to share both the positive and the negative feedback he received with the field, the FHN became a rich weekly chronicle of current events in the profession. Here the Developer held court, exhorted and cavorted, praised his supporters, reprimanded his opponents and detractors, and filled his readers with “spizzerinctum.” The “PSC boys,” as he called his alumni, could stay in close touch with their leader and their alma mater, and felt some sense of security amidst the ever growing persecution from organized medicine, because B.J. was obviously on top of whatever was happening. The FHN let its readers know that the Developer was going to defend them and save them, especially if they were PSC boys and/or UCA members.

The FHN employed the new system for marking the years that B.J. devised, for example, “A.C. 28” for 1922. First introduced with the June 24, 1916 issue of the FHN (Volume 5, Number 19), the “A.C.” dating of the newsletter was a parody of Christians’ “Anno Domino,” and marked time from 18 September 1895, the supposed date of the first adjustment. It was characteristically B.J., and reminded his audience with every issue that chiropractic was as significant as religion, and that its date of discovery was at least as important as the birth of the Nazarene. And no one should forget who bore the cross for chiropractic.

The FHN was but one component in B.J.’s ever growing publishing empire. The PSC also produced The P.S.C. Clinical Journal, The Chiropractor, and a wide range of “disease tracts” and wall charts (Palmer, 1917b), and, of course, the well known series of volumes referred to as the “green books” (Wiese & Lykins, 1986). Palmer showed no sense of exclusivity or proprietorship about advertising ideas. He welcomed innovation from his “boys” in the field, and shared novel tactics with his FHN readers. He was particularly partial to the “free clinic idea,” wherein chiropractors offered their services gratis to the indigent or to children or to uniformed servicemen and veterans. Free clinical services had been used to good effect in the early efforts to attract the attention of legislators to the new discipline, and were well received by the disabled soldiers of the world war. Palmer was happy to collaborate on most any project which raised the visibility of the profession.

“Palmergrams” (Palmer, 1949, pp. 225-7; Wills, 1987, pp. 102-3) or “travelgrams” (An, 1919; Ashworth, 1920; No, 1919; Palmer, 1923) may be seen as an extension of the free clinic promotions. A Palmergram was a certificate issued by B.J. which guaranteed chiropractic care, at no charge to the patient, and reimbursement to any chiropractor who accepted the case. Circus workers were frequent recipients. The Developer’s enthusiastic alumni were usually more than happy to acknowledge the publicity that Palmer had brought to them, and provided service gratis. B.J. let it be known that any doctor who objected to providing the chiropractic care without compensation could send the bill to him, and Palmer would pay. Anyone who sent in such a bill, or any chiropractor who refused to provide care, could expect to hear about it in the FHN.

by Joseph Keating Jr.,PhD

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Vaccinations by Elbert Hubbard

Elbert Hubbard 3SHORT time ago I spent a week in Saint Louis. During that week there were three deaths of children from tetanus (lock-jaw), all the direct result of vaccination. The Board of Health had been very busy, and all children that could not show a scar were vaccinated, this without consent of the parents or of the child. For each vaccination the city paid the kind doctors delegated to do the work, the sum of fifty cents. That is to say, these physicians operated on healthy children, introducing a poison into their systems, thus giving them a disease, in order to prevent them from having one—all for half a dollar per child. The three children that died netted the doctors a dollar and a half.

As before stated, these children died, and scores of others were made seriously ill. How many were poisoned for life no one knows. Children know all that the parents know, and the report that vaccination had killed several struck panic to the hearts of those not yet vaccinated. Many children refused to go to school for fear of the doctors. And such was the alarm through non-attendance that the School Board called a meeting and passed a resolution asking the Board of Health to desist from these fifty-cent operations until the question of the quality of the virus used could be passed upon.

Now, there is no such thing as a “pure virus.” Vaccine virus is a poison in itself. And vaccination, if it “takes,” always reduces the resiliency or resisting-power of the patient, laying him open to any germ that may be flying around that way.

The President of the Board of Health took refuge behind the law, which required him to vaccinate the school-children. But personally he said he thought the whole system was founded on a superstition, and on a very barren assumption.

Said the physician: “Many people who are vaccinated never have smallpox. A few who are vaccinated have smallpox. To assume that those who are vaccinated would have smallpox if they were not vaccinated is childish reasoning, fit only for those who are willing to accept a tainted plea, because they are already convinced. I must admit that the logic of vaccination is no reason at all, and could only appeal to prejudiced, ignorant and unthinking people. I wish we were rid of the whole thing, but I am not strong enough to stem the tide. Doctors get paid for vaccination, the books and colleges uphold it, and this thing will go on until the people revolt, which I hope they will do soon.”

Here we get the expression of an honest man—an Allopath physician—caught in the toils of Custom. Physicians are instructed from books, in colleges, and by professors who were taught from books in colleges. This is not knowledge: it is the memorizing of things evolved many years ago by men who knew much less than we do. Very few physicians know how to live.

Everywhere you find doctors who are soaked in tobacco, booze and dope, breathing foul air, thinking vile thoughts, resorting to stimulants as a pick-me-up. These are the men that uphold vaccination—these are the men who assaulted the school-children of Saint Louis, and forced a poison into their healthy bodies for fifty cents a body. Oh, the shame of it!

Immunity from disease comes from fresh air, pure water, clean surroundings, an active, useful life, and kind thoughts.

The fear wrought in a school by one of these bewhiskered rogues, with his outfit of scalpels, scarifiers and poison, is a cause of disease in itself. The plan of vaccinating the mind with the virus of fear is in itself a crime, and a most common cause of disease.

[Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. He was an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts movement and is, perhaps, most famous for his essay A Message to Garcia.]

Paul Turnbull (727) 643-8376

 

 

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Right Adjustment by Elbert Hubbard – 1910

Elbert Hubbard and B.J. Palmer were the best of friends, here is Elbert’s tribute to Chiropractic:

“We live in the age of investigation. We are all citizens of Missouri – show me! Bluf has had its day, and the operations of both business and professional men are now conducted out in the open, and subjected to the X-rays of critical analysis and the acid test of truth and reason.”

“Science has now lost its academic significance; and instead of being almost wholly associated with the occult and the mysterious, it is recog­nized as being simply common sense classified and intelligently applied.”

“We are beginning to think for ourselves, to seek for causes, instead of evolving remedies or effects. On the other hand we see hoary ideas and antiquated methods discarded and old superstition and dogma decorating the junk -pile.”

“A natural result of this spirit of inquiry has been in the increasing ten­dency to make the body the temple of health – strong and efficient.”

“So in the scrap-heap the keen observer will see musty, dusty boxes and bottles, and ‘scraps of paper’ written in a dead language. They are drugs, dope and prescriptions representing well-meant but pathetic efforts to cure disease or correct its effects – medicine given to correct the evils of medication.”

“We are beginning to realize the futility of pills and potions.”

“They do not cure – they only temporize. And to reason from a diagnosis is illogical – as the post-mortem will show.”

“The only logical way to health is to remove the cause of the disease.” “And this Chiropractic does.”

“Chiropractic is the science which has brought the backbone to the front, so to speak. Incidentally, it is done much to give vim to the vimless, substituting health for disease.”

“Chiropractic is based upon the assumption that all diseases have their cause in subluxation – that is partial dislocation – of the spine, which exercises undue pressure on the spinal nerves.”

“This impingement, or pinch, restricts the flow of mental impulses at some point in their passage through the nerves, from their origin in the brain to the tissues which they supply with mental energy.”

“Their source of food-supply is cut of, and they give notice in their own way by abnormal expression – by giving us pain.”

“For pain is the cry of an injured nerve.”

“Man is a machine. And even as up-to-date machinery – well balanced and controlled, free from undue friction – is a prime necessity to the manufacturer if he must produce the goods, so is it equally imperative that man be healthy, sound in mind and body, free from dis-ease, if he would succeed. ”

“And the Chiropractor is the expert engineer whose practiced eye and skillful hands adjust the broken down human machine, restoring it to robust health and its wonted vigor.”

“Chiropractic goes direct to the cause, instead of shilly-shallying or dillydallying with effects. ”

“It removes the obstruction from the hose that carries the vital current, reestablishing its free flow.”

“It places the individual in rapport with himself and with nature, the great healer.”

“This is the chief object of the Chiropractor: to restore harmony – to adjust the short-circuited wires of the nervous system and keep open the lines of communication between “Central” and the various “branches” – in other words, to get the body into thorough working order. ”

“Hence the Chiropractor does not clog the human mechanism with dope or drugs, nor does he resort to saw and scalpel.”

“His practice is bloodless and drugless. Adjustments are practically painless and the work of but a moment. ”

“You have nothing to fear at the hands of a competent Chiropractor. He is kind, gentle, patient, skillful – he is your friend. Also he is your teacher. ”

“A GOOD Chiropractor not only knows the science of adjustment of the spine, but he knows also life in general, and so is the better fitted to practice the healing art.”

“He is always more interested in health than disease.”

“He ever keeps in mind the ideal of perfect health and ever works to that end. His plan always seems to be to open up the sluiceway, to clear a path through the woods, to remove the rocks from the channel. He moves towards the definite point of health and happiness. ”

“And we are only well and happy and able to think, to work and to suc­ceed, when the spinal column is able to do its perfect work.”

“‘We are bathed in an Ocean of Intelligence’ says Emerson. The world is Spirit. Spirit takes material forms and one of these is the human body. The soul seems to be a part of the Great Spirit, partially segregated, as it were, in the individual body. ”

“Our business is to allow this Spirit to play through us. So the happy, relaxed, generous mood is always the healthy mood. ”

“We are a part of Nature – in fact, we are Nature. Nature is our Mother; and the more we love Nature, the more we understand her, the more we move with Nature the happier and better we are. ”

“The penalties of life are for the disobedience of the laws of Nature. The blessings of life come from being one with the Universal Mother, and the approachable, kindly and able Chiropractor adds to our gladness, efficiency and length of days by his knowledge of, and belief in, ‘right adjustment. ’”

Paul Turnbull (727) 445-7842

EP Management, Inc,

www.expandingpractice.com

 

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You Have Nothing to Fear

Elbert Hubbard“You have nothing to fear at the hands of a competent Chiropractor. He is kind, gentle, patient, skillful — he is your friend.  Also he is your teacher.  A good Chiropractor not only knows the science of adjustment of the spine, but he knows also life in general, ans so is better fitted to practice the healing art.

“He is always more interested in health than disease.

“He ever keeps in mind the ideal of perfect health and ever works to that end. His plan always seems to be to open up the sluiceway, to clear a path through the woods, to remove the rocks from the channel. He moves towards the definite point of health and happiness. And we are only well and happy and able to think, to work, and to succeed, when the spinal column is able to do its perfect work.”

Elbert Hubbard

 

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Persistence

Elbert Hubbard and B.J. Palmer“In business, sometimes, prospects may seem darkest when really they are on the turn. A  little more persistence, a little more effort, and what seemed hopeless failure may turn to glorious success. There is no failure except in no longer trying. There is no defeat except from within, no really insurmountable barrier save our own inherent weakness of purpose.”

“The supreme prayer of my heart is not to be learned or good, but to be Radiant. I desire to radiate health, cheerfulness, sincerity, calm courage and good will. I wish to be simple, honest, natural, frank, clean in mind and clean in body unaffected; ready to say, ‘I don’t know,’ if so it be, to meet all men on an absolute equality; to face any obstacle and meet every difficulty unafraid and unabashed. I wish others to live their lives, too, up to their highest, fullest and best. To that end I pray that I may never meddle, dictate, interfere, give advice that is not wanted, nor assist when my services are not needed. If I can help people I’ll do it by giving them a chance to help themselves; and if I can uplift or inspire let it be by example, inference and suggestion, rather than by injunction and dictation. That is to say, I desire to be Radiant— to Radiate Life.”

Elbert Hubbard

 

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Vaccinations by Elbert Hubbard

SHORT time ago I spent a week in Saint Louis. During that week there were three deaths of children from tetanus (lock-jaw), all the direct result of vaccination. The Board of Health had been very busy, and all children that could not show a scar were vaccinated, this without consent of the parents or of the child. For each vaccination the city paid the kind doctors delegated to do the work, the sum of fifty cents. That is to say, these physicians operated on healthy children, introducing a poison into their systems, thus giving them a disease, in order to prevent them from having one—all for half a dollar per child. The three children that died netted the doctors a dollar and a half.

 

As before stated, these children died, and scores of others were made seriously ill. How many were poisoned for life no one knows. Children know all that the parents know, and the report that vaccination had killed several struck panic to the hearts of those not yet vaccinated. Many children refused to go to school for fear of the doctors. And such was the alarm through non-attendance that the School Board called a meeting and passed a resolution asking the Board of Health to desist from these fifty-cent operations until the question of the quality of the virus used could be passed upon.

 

Now, there is no such thing as a “pure virus.” Vaccine virus is a poison in itself. And vaccination, if it “takes,” always reduces the resiliency or resisting-power of the patient, laying him open to any germ that may be flying around that way.

 

The President of the Board of Health took refuge behind the law, which required him to vaccinate the school-children. But personally he said he thought the whole system was founded on a superstition, and on a very barren assumption.

 

Said the physician: “Many people who are vaccinated never have smallpox. A few who are vaccinated have smallpox. To assume that those who are vaccinated would have smallpox if they were not vaccinated is childish reasoning, fit only for those who are willing to accept a tainted plea, because they are already convinced. I must admit that the logic of vaccination is no reason at all, and could only appeal to prejudiced, ignorant and unthinking people. I wish we were rid of the whole thing, but I am not strong enough to stem the tide. Doctors get paid for vaccination, the books and colleges uphold it, and this thing will go on until the people revolt, which I hope they will do soon.”

 

Here we get the expression of an honest man—an Allopath physician—caught in the toils of Custom. Physicians are instructed from books, in colleges, and by professors who were taught from books in colleges. This is not knowledge: it is the memorizing of things evolved many years ago by men who knew much less than we do. Very few physicians know how to live.

 

Everywhere you find doctors who are soaked in tobacco, booze and dope, breathing foul air, thinking vile thoughts, resorting to stimulants as a pick-me-up. These are the men that uphold vaccination—these are the men who assaulted the school-children of Saint Louis, and forced a poison into their healthy bodies for fifty cents a body. Oh, the shame of it!

 

Immunity from disease comes from fresh air, pure water, clean surroundings, an active, useful life, and kind thoughts.

 

The fear wrought in a school by one of these bewhiskered rogues, with his outfit of scalpels, scarifiers and poison, is a cause of disease in itself. The plan of vaccinating the mind with the virus of fear is in itself a crime, and a most common cause of disease.

 

[Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. He was an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts movement and is, perhaps, most famous for his essay A Message to Garcia.]

 
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Posted by on September 27, 2008 in Chiropractic, Elbert Hubbard

 

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Survival Value

Elbert Hubbard (1856 – 1915) and B.J. Palmer (1881 – 1961) often got together to discuss world events and how to help their fellow man. They both wrote several books, articles, and published newspapers on the subjects of life, liberty, health and the pursuit of happiness. Here is an explanation from the book “Evolution or Revolution by B.J. of how the the term “Survival Values” was coined: 

Some years ago, during one of his periodical visits to us here at our home, over the     dinner table, the late Elbert Hubbard asked me: “WHAT ARE THE TWO MOST VALUABLE WORDS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE?”

I told him I had never given it a thot, and asked, What are yours?

SURVIVAL VALUE.

I told him quite frankly I didn’t see much in them, to which he replied:

GIVE THEM TIME. THEY WILL GROW ON YOU.

They have become a landmark in our thinking, ever since.

Later, we enlarged HIS thot. We added four more words:

ACCUMULATIVE CONSTRUCTIVE SURVIVAL VALUE

AND

ACCUMULATIVE DESTRUCTIVE SURVIVAL VALUE

meaning that what uses a person makes of his time–thinking, saying, and doing–are ACCUMULATIVE, day after day, year after year; and as they accumulate they are either CONSTRUCTIVE for welfare of man, or DESTRUCTIVE, injuring people with whom he commingled.

Elbert Hubbard’s life had an

ACCUMULATIVE CONSTRUCTIVE SURVIVAL VALUE

Hitler’s life was that of

ACCUMULATIVE DESTRUCTIVE SURVIVAL VALUE

By B. J. Palmer, D.C., Ph. C

 

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